Posts Tagged independent film

STEELE INTERVIEWS: Claudia Myers

Michelle Steely Eyed

Fort Bliss, written and directed by Claudia Myers, came out in December. It’s the second feature film for Myers. She also wrote and directed Kettle of Fish starring Gina Gershon and Matthew Modine. She’s made lots short films and documentaries for the military such as ones about combat stress and PTSD and severely injured soldiers returning from Iraq and the impact to their personal lives.

Fort Bliss movingly and effectively shows the difficulties that a single mom in the military faces in balancing her career as a medic and her home life. Michelle Monaghan turns in a strong, edgy and multifaceted performance as Maggie. It’s currently streaming on Netflix and iTunes and absolutely a must-see.

After some back and forth on twitter, Claudia Myers and I spoke on the phone a few weeks ago.

Amy Steele: You live in DC– outside the Hollywood scene but close enough to New York. How is that for you as a filmmaker?
[Claudia is a professor at American University so has that stability and commitment.]

Claudia Myers: Positive is that I wouldn’t have written Fort Bliss. That first assignment to work with the military with a local company. I wouldn’t have had that opportunity in another city. It sparked my interest in the military stories. I like the Wash DC film community. It’s much smaller but it’s very supportive and I receive a lot of support from American Univ.

DC is a diverse city in terms of its interest. It’s not dominated by film and it can be a positive.

writer/director Claudia Myers

writer/director Claudia Myers

Amy Steele: Do you think you can live anywhere and be an independent filmmaker?

Claudia Myers: Depends on what you want to do. If you want to work in TV or film it helps to work in NY or LA but there’s also more competition but to write and direct your own project it helps to be in places where there’s smaller film industry.

Amy Steele: You’re a professor of film at American University. What do you like about teaching? What influence does it have on your film-making?

Claudia Myers: I’ve been teaching for seven years. Being a teacher and being a filmmaker simultaneously forces me to keep thinking critically about what I do. So I feel like with every new class I learn something from my students. They challenge me to look at things differently or explain things better. It keeps me engaged and sharp and more current.

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Amy Steele: Where did you get the idea to write Fort Bliss?

Claudia Myers: Working on a training film for the army at the actual Fort Bliss. Was doing a focus group with infantry soldiers and one was a single dad who had deployed twice to Iraq and I remember being surprised by that. I never thought about a soldier facing multiple deployments as a single parent. As a mother it piqued my interest. Was something I’d never thought about.

Roughly 40% of women in the military are moms. As I developed the story, I felt like telling the ultimate working mother story. As any parent trying to balance with a career they think is meaningful and important with raising a child.

There was a story to be told that hadn’t been told from a female perspective. I found it wasn’t such an unusual circumstance. I would hear “my sister is in that situation” or “I know someone just like that.” It is gratifying that it is a projection of this and interesting to get people thinking about how women are perceived.

People would connect in a way that they hadn’t thought about.

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Amy Steele: Why did you make Maggie a single mom?

Claudia Myers: That was a side of the story I hadn’t seen told and a side of the story I could relate to as a mother and get a strong sense of connection. A real empathy and curiosity for women in the military balancing career and being a parent. To make an independent film there has to be a reason to do it and I hadn’t seen that story told.

Amy Steele: I didn’t think it all that unusual for a woman to serve in the military with a young child at home but I browsed a message board and people thought it strange. This was Maggie’s job. I don’t think she was trying to get away from her son at all but she liked what she did and was trying to secure a better future wasn’t she?

Claudia Myers: I’ve had some conversations with people who don’t understand that she re-enlisted and then got caught in a set of circumstance. As in life there are no right solutions and people do the best they can under the circumstances. Everyone just does the best they can. I wasn’t trying to demonize anyone or make anyone a villain.

As a filmmaker and viewer I have empathy for Maggie but she makes some questionable choices and that’s fine. We sometimes recognize ourselves in a character’s flaws. I wasn’t interested in making her perfect.
Why is it cool for a guy to go off and fight and leave his family but for a woman she’s abandoning her family, she’s a terrible mother.

Claudia Myers: Such an emotional response to the story is a good thing. It gets people to think about their feelings about these things. Things have been changing for a while. Can it ever be completely equal. I don’t know that I have an answer. That’s why I wrote the movie. I was happy when I was writing the script and I wasn’t sure how I could resolve this in a way that was honest.

Amy Steele: How long did it take from script to screen?

Claudia Myers: I got the idea about five years ago. I was intrigued by this character who was a soldier and a mother and was balancing these two sides of her life in an extreme situation. Worked on [the script] on and off for years. It took time to get funding. We had a leisurely editing process. It was good in that it was always on my mind but I wasn’t working on it constantly. The shoot itself was quick. We shot it in 21 days.

Amy Steele: By choice or necessity?

Claudia Myers: It’s never a choice. We always want more time. It was a very intense shooting schedule. It gave the whole process an energy. Everybody wanted to be there. Everyone on our team was really dedicated. That included a number of veterans on the film itself and active duty soldiers. That grounded the production. It helped creating a greater sense of authenticity. The army supported the film so we had subject matter experts. Michelle [Monaghan] was trained by a medic. The army was tremendous in their support.

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Amy Steele: Did you screen it at Fort Bliss?

Claudia Myers: It opened at Fort Bliss and in NY and LA in December.

Amy Steele: And what was the reaction?

Claudia Myers:The reaction has been very positive. Also we had a Los Angeles screening by Veterans in Film and TV [VFT]. 400 veterans at LA premiere. The film got a standing ovation. it was a special night.

Amy Steele: What kind of director are you?

Claudia Myers: I love the whole process. I love working with actors. I just have a lot of respect and admiration for the actors’ craft. I see my job as being as clear as possible about what I’m trying to achieve. What the story’s about, what I’m fundamentally getting to and I work with the various departments to help me bring the story to life. I welcome their input so it’s a real collaboration.

Amy Steele: What were the greatest challenges for this film?

Claudia Myers: So many intense or logistically different scenes on a short time frame and budget. I think that was the overall production challenge. Michelle was so committed and so passionate about the script. As preparation she did an abbreviated medic course. She was a great collaborator. I felt that she understood all the sides of this character which I wanted to bring out. She didn’t hold back and she gave an incredible performance.
The weather was another challenge. It was very hot. We shot in the desert in 100 degree weather. We felt the importance in sharing this story.

Amy Steele: I’m going to remind readers of some statistics of women filmmakers from Indie Wire, 2014:

• 29.8% of filmmakers (directors, writers, producers, cinematographers and editors) were female.
• Women were 16% of the directors, executive producers, producers, writers, cinematographers, and editors working on the top 250 domestic grossing films.
• Women directed 6% of the films.
• Women wrote 10% of the movies.

Amy Steele: What are the barriers facing female filmmakers today? What do you think needs to change? Is it getting better?

Claudia Myers: It is getting better. Maybe a little bit outside the studio. I think there are a lot of independent women directors/writers working. It isn’t a level playing field. There’s a lot of progress needing to be made. People can support films written and directed by women. They can seek them out and watch more of them. I think the more attention we pay it is a positive thing. I hope the trend keeps developing. It’s slower than it should be for sure.

Distributors are still trying to figure out revenues with all these distribution strategies. It’s not what it used to be. We aren’t quite at the place optimally.

In terms of female films being less lucrative, it’s demand driven. If people make a point of watching those films and more films about female protagonists. More films about women. The vast majority of mainstream films feature male protagonists. Some stories need to be told the way they need to be told. You need multi-layered complex women in film. Actresses are eager for more meaty roles.

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Indie Films Vs. The Box Office


Although I’m not raving about the film My Life in Ruins this week, in general I usually see independent films. The stories are more compelling and the characters more realistic/quirky/unusual. There’s more depth and perhaps care that goes into an independent film. You are most likely not going to see a re-make of a TV show, a 1970s or 80s movie, or a sequel. It will be low budget and therefore everyone is invested in the project from the key grips to the caterers to the makeup artists to the screenwriter to the director to the actors.

I vehemently support independent film. I am a member and proud supporter of The Coolidge Corner Theatre in Brookline, Mass. I’m sorry some films do not get the chance to be screened in more theaters. Looking at the mixed reviews of My Life in Ruins and the number of screens it is showing on throughout the country, I do not think it will last that long. Although Transformers and Public Enemies do not open until near July 4th weekend, it’s the summer season [the season of mindless BLOCKBUSTERS] and if a film doesn’t hit that $100 million mark pretty fast, it’s out and on to the next one. I hope that is not the case. It’s very sad that a film does not have an adequate chance to earn an audience via word of mouth at the box office.


Sure I will go see The Hangover in the next few days [I’ve had a crush on Bradley Cooper since Alias] but I’ve already seen The Brothers Bloom, and Easy Virtue. I have yet to see Star Trek and Angels and Demons. [I thoroughly enjoyed the escapist Drag Me to Hell though]

My inclination is to see the independent film before I see the major release. Rudy y Cursi, The Girlfriend Experience and Away We Go are on my to-do list. It’s just my style and my preference. Indie usually means greater quality to me [Brokeback Mountain anyone? I took my mom to see it at Coolidge Corner Theatre on Christmas Day. I had already seen it once on opening day.] Of course in these economic times, shelling out $10 for a movie better be worth it so you have to analyze whether a movie is theatre-worthy or netflix material.

I’m lucky that in Boston, besides The Coolidge Corner Theatre, I have The Landmark Kendall/Embassy Theatres as well as W. Newton and Somerville which show indie films on a regular basis. The Brattle Theatre, Harvard Film Archives, and MFA Film (also a member there) run retrospectives and show classics, cult films, and indies.

As the huge conglomerate chain theaters [AMC, Regal, Showcase] take over and movies are being shown on three or four screens at half-hour intervals, if you want to see independent films in your city or town you need to:
ASK your local theaters to show the films you want.

When you see and like an independent film, tell friends. Call, email, twitter, use facebook, blog. Spread the word! Word of mouth is how a small film like Slumdog Millionaire made millions and ending up winning an Academy Award [besides also being an outstanding film].

Talk to the theater managers and explain to them that while The Hangover is really funny and Bradley Cooper is super cute, Easy Virtue might be a charming little film to balance it out. Doesn’t the theatre want more diversity in its selection of films? [No, it really just wants to make tons of money.]

Get all your friends to bombard the theater with phone calls demanding that a certain independent film that is coming out be shown at the theater or you will take a nice road trip to another town to see said film.

Join your local independent theater. You will get discounts, invitations to special events, and can feel great about keeping independent film alive and going.

Keep an eye out at local universities, museums, and libraries for showings of independent films.

If all this fails, boycott the theater and join Netflix. It has a decent selection of indies.

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