Posts Tagged feminism

Comparing and contrasting Bad Feminist and Unspeakable Things: feminist essays by two generations of feminists

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“No matter what issues I have with feminism, I am a feminist. I cannot and will not deny the importance and absolute necessity of feminism. Like most people, I’m full of contradictions, but I also don’t want to be treated like shit for being a woman.”
—Roxanne Gay

unspeakable things

“Feminism is not a set of rules. It is not about taking rights away from men, as if there were a finite amount of liberty to go around. There is an abundance of liberty to be had if we have the guts to grasp it for everyone. Feminism is a social revolution, and a sexual revolution, and feminism is in no way content with a missionary position. It is about work, and about love, and about how one depends very much on the other. Feminism is about asking questions, and carrying on asking them even when the questions get uncomfortable.”
–Laurie Penny

Two well-known feminist authors/columnists, Roxanne Gay and Laurie Penny, released essay collections. Roxanne Gay is a GenXer and has much more life-experience than 27-year-old Laurie Penny. Although with all her protest and underground movement experience, Penny might think she has more life experience. Gay is American and makes her living as a cultural critic and teacher. She grew up in a mostly white town with a middle-class upbringing. Penny is British with a career as a political reporter. She’s a contributing editor at New Statesman and editor at large at the New Inquiry. Penny seems to do a lot of protesting, squatting and couch surfing.

Both women write essays on what it means to be a feminist, on various women’s issues such as contraception and pay equity and a feminist perspective on various news and pop culture items. Both are serious about being feminist and about the importance of feminism in today’s world. With different writing styles—Gay tends to write with humor and a cheerier flair while Penny utilizes a more aggressive approach– they both present a clear message about the urgency facing feminists today. Read both works. They’re well-crafted, dynamic and provocative particularly for any woman who’s ever heard a man say “Oh you must be some kind of feminist.”

Being close in age to Gay, I could relate to nearly everything she said– except that I never read Sweet Valley High. I was reading other books. I was riding ponies and horses. Penny represents the newer generation of feminists who embrace lifestyles and methodology that I’m not used to. In fact, Penny had this to say: “The young women of today know far better than their slightly-older sisters who came of age in the listless 1990s how much work is still to be done, and how unglamorous much of it is. They know how bloody important it is to talk about power, and class, and work, and love, race, poverty and gender identity.” I could’ve stopped reading right there. Listless 1990s? I was in my 20s and it was a fantastic time. I’ve identified as a feminist since 5th grade and have been active and outspoken about my feminism all along. I found this a bit dismissive and offensive. What happened to sisters supporting sisters? Gay writes in “How to Be Friends with Another Woman”: “Abandon the cultural myth that all female friendships must be bitchy, toxic, or competitive. This myth is like heels and purses—pretty but designed to SLOW women down.”

Gay breaks down Bad Feminist with these sections: ME; GENDER & SEXUALITY; RACE & ENTERTAINMENT; POLITICS, GENDER & RACE; BACK TO ME. Essays within each section. Penny has five chapters in Unspeakable Things: Fucked-Up Girls; Lost Boys; Anticlimax; Cybersexism; Love and Lies.

“I get angry when women disavow feminism and shun the feminist label but say they support all the advances born of feminism because I see a disconnect that does not need to be there. I get angry but I understand and hope someday we will live in a culture where we don’t need to distance ourselves from the feminist label, where the label doesn’t make us afraid of being alone, of being too different, of wanting too much.” —Roxanne Gay

Gay has a penchant for pop culture and some feminine frippery, thus she labels herself a bad feminist. Can you be a feminine feminist? Can you like looking pretty and favor the color pink. Is a feminist a sell-out if she wants to be taken care of by a man. If she wants the support and constant of a serious relationship. If she doesn’t want to know how her car functions, sometimes fakes orgasms and closes her office door for a good cry? Gay likes watching reality shows, listening to questionable hip-hop and picking apart cultural phenomena. In clear, strong words she thoughtfully writes about Chris Brown, the song “Blurred Lines,” The Hunger Games, The Help, Django Unchained and Fifty Shades of Gray.

“A culture that treats women as objects, that gleefully supports entertainment that is more often demeaning toward women than it is not, that encourages the erosion of a woman’s autonomy and personal space, is the same culture that elects state lawmakers who work tirelessly to enact restrictive abortion legislation.”

In the essay “Girls, Girls, Girls” she discusses the Lena Dunham vehicle Girls as well as women on television. “Girls have been written and represented in popular culture in many different ways. Most of these representations have been largely unsatisfying because they never get girlhood quite right. It is not possible for girlhood to be represented wholly—girlhood is too vast and too individual an experience.” She also adds: “There are so many terrible shows on television representing women in sexist, stupid, silly ways. Movies are even worse. Movies take one or two anemic ideas about women, caricature them, and shove those caricatures down our throats. Indie films provide the most expansive and feminist representations of women. Unfortunately Hollywood’s a sexist environment and there are less female writers, directors and producers making films and television programs than men.

Gay writes about serious matters such as violence against women in “The Careless Language of Sexual Violence” where she addresses society’s desensitization. “While there are many people who understand rape and the damage of rape, we also live in a time that necessitates the phrase “rape culture.”) As I read about her dislike for the term triggers in the “Illusion of Safety/The Safety of Illusion,” I fervently nodded in agreement. “Trigger warnings also, when used in excess, start to feel like censorship. They suggest that there are experiences or perspectives to inappropriate, too explicit, too bare to be voiced publicly.” In “When Twitter Does What Journalism Cannot,” Gay says: “Social networks are more than just infinite repositories for trivial, snap judgments; they are more than merely convenient outlets for mindless joy and outrage. They offer more than the common ground and the solace we may find during culturally significant movements. Social networks also provide us with something of a flawed but necessary conscience, a constant reminder that commitment, compassion, and advocacy neither can nor ever should be finite.”

In the essay “The Alienable Rights of Women,” Gay accentuates all the issues with birth control and women’s constant fear that we’ll lose every personal right for sexual freedom we possess. “Birth control is a pain in the ass. It’s a medical marvel, but it is also an imperfect marvel. Most of the time, women have to put something into their bodies that alters their bodies’ natural functions just so they can have a sexual life and prevent unwanted pregnancies.” Penny too tackles the attack on women’s bodies. She writes in “Anticlimax:” “The backlash against abortion access and contraceptive availability is a sexist backlash, rooted in fear of female autonomy and hatred of women’s sexuality.”

Both women are avid readers and both women like Kate Zambreno. I have Green Girl sitting here and must read it soon. Of Green Girl, Gay writes: “She wants to put her fist through a window but doesn’t because she knows that’s not what is expected of a green girl. She knows she is beautiful but does not necessarily feel her beauty inside. Throughout the novel, these tensions are brightly exposed over and over. At times, the novel makes it seem that to be a green girl is to be in a rather hopeless predicament.” Of Heroines, Gay writes: “They say that every writer has an obsession, and in Heroines, that obsession is reclamation or, perhaps breaking new ground where women can be feminist and feminine and resist the labels and forces that too often marginalize, silence, or erase female experiences.” And in explaining how her career intimidates men, Penny writes: “I would have understood what Kate Zambreno means when she says, in her marvelous book Heroines, I do not want to be an ugly woman, and when I write, I am an ugly woman.”

Women must be likeable which usually means not being terribly outspoken, loud or opinionated. And who wants to be like that? Both Gay and Penny often felt like (and sometimes still do) outcasts for various choices, career goals and how they express themselves. From “Not Here to Make Friends”: “As a writer and a person who has struggled with likeability—being likable, wanted to be liked, wanting to belong—I have spent a great deal of time thinking about likeability in the stories I read and those I write.” An unlikeable man in literature becomes intriguing, dark, compelling. An unlikable woman on the page remains perplexing, a complete outcast and rather hopeless. In her essay “Fucked-Up Girls,” Penny discusses her struggles with an eating disorder and the rampant desire for perfection combined with society’s unrealistic expectations for women. Penny writes: “Of all the female sins, hunger is the least forgivable; hunger for anything, for food, sex, power, education, even love. If we have desires, we are expected to conceal them, to control them, to keep ourselves in check. We are supposed to be objects of desire, not desiring beings.” Dark prospects indeed. The pressures of being female. She adds: “The perfect girl is a blank slate, with just enough personality to make her interesting enough to take to bed.”

Penny has been a young activist in various political movements such as Occupy and she pays careful attention to address gender, race, sexuality and class structure. She focuses on her activism and the underground cultural movement. The radical methods to address conflict and issues in our culture. She elicits a call to action for men to become involved in the feminist movement in “Lost Boys.” As someone who’s been cyberharassed for four years, I took solace in a kindred soul in Penny. In “Cybersexism” she boldly and rightly states: “The Internet creates offline prejudices and changes them, twists them, makes them voyeuristic, and anonymity and physical distance makes it easier for some individuals to treat other people as less than human.” She adds: “Freedom of speech does not include the freedom to abuse and silence others with impunity.”

The veracity of Penny’s ideas on independence and not giving in to societal expectations to couple up, have a monogamous relationship are poignant and quite how I feel as a never-married, childfree by choice feminist of 45. The entire chapter “Love and Lies” is a brilliant turn-about on societal expectations for coupling, for love to be the ultimate goal for everyone’s happiness and to sustain one’s own self and one’s own interests to be satisfied. This IS OKAY. Penny writes: “But I refuse to burn my energy adding extra magic and sparkle to other people’s lives to get them to love me. I’m busy casting spells for myself. Everyone who was ever told a fairy tale knows what happens to women who do their own magic.” And this: “We are all encouraged to feel sorry for ourselves if we are single, to consider ourselves incomplete, but women in particular are urged to consider themselves inferior if their time is not spent comforting and cosseting a man, and ideally children too.” What a sad sad thing. You’re still single? How about people’s obsession with Renee Zellweger, Cameron Diaz and Jennifer Aniston finding the “right” man, get married and procreating. It’s revolting and we need to revolt against it. Fight. Speak up. Be yourself and don’t let anyone tell you that you’re less than.

Laurie Penny reads at Harvard Book Store on Friday, September 26, 2014 at 7pm.

Bad Feminist: Essays by Roxanne Gay. Publisher: Harper Perennial [August 2014]. Feminism. Essays. Paperback. 320 pages.

RATING: ****/5*

Unspeakable Things: Sex, Lies and Revolution by Laurie Penny. Publisher: Bloomsbury USA [September 2014]. Feminism. Essays. Paperback. 288 pages.

RATING: ****/5*

Review by Amy Steele

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Bad Feminist
by Roxane Gay
Powells.com

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Choice Quotes: Zoe Kazan

Zoe Kazan

from an interview with The Frisky, August 6, 2014

on being a woman and a screenwriter in Hollywood:

“Sure, I think it’s difficult to be a woman in Hollywood, period. There is a glass ceiling, of course, but I also think it’s just a more slippery ladder for executives, for writers, for directors, especially for female directors, and for actresses, too. It’s not an easy world to be in, so you have to sort of be your own champion. For me, writing is an important part of how I keep myself sane, essentially, and I feel lucky that people have given me the opportunity to have my work produced, but I would do it even if no one did that. It’s sort of my outlet.”

on being a feminist:

“I think that the [negativity associated with the] label discourages some women from calling themselves that. I think saying that you’re a feminist is a little bit like saying that you’re a humanist, because what it’s really about is equal opportunities and equal thinking about genders being only a part of your identity rather than something that would define you and define your character. … I had a hard time when I was younger sort of reconciling my feminism and my femininity.”

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Choice Quote: Dakota Fanning

dakota fanning

“It’s about both genders being equal. There’s a history where when women get to a certain age in this industry, the roles become strictly the mother, the wife, or the older single woman. There should be more of a variety because there are so many different paths that humans take and they should be given a platform to be seen.”

–Dakota Fanning on women in Hollywood and film, The Daily Beast, May 29, 2014

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DVD: AFTER TILLER a must-see documentary

after tiller

A powerful and inspirational documentary filmed with a calm focus through beautiful and reflective moments. Directed and produced by Martha Shane and Lana Wilson.

It’s legal to perform third-term abortions in nine states and (at the time of filming), only four doctors in the United States openly performed third-term abortions.

“At times I struggle and times I don’t and I always come back to the woman and what she’s going through and what life will this baby have. What will it mean to be alive with horrific fetal abnormalities? It’s not just about being alive. It’s about life and what does it mean.”
–Dr. Shelley Sella

“There’s two reactions to being bullied. One is to pull your head in and try to get away from the bully and the other is to go ‘oh yeah.’ That’s how I feel.”
–Dr. Susan Robinson

“(The anti-abortion threats) are a traumatic experience for everybody in my family. It’s been hard for me to feel sometimes that I can continue.”
–Dr. Warren Hern

“Things have changed since Dr. Tiller’s death. And it’s a shame George had to die to get that started. I think he did get a lot of the dialogue started that’s going on today. We don’t have Dr. Tiller anymore but we still have four of us who are still practicing and I think Dr. Tiller would be proud that we’re still carrying on his work.”
–Dr. LeRoy Carhart

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music review: Megafauna

maximalist

Guitarist/vocalist Dani Neff, drummer Zack Humphrey and bassist Greg Yancey recorded an impressive, spectacular album filled with garage-rock, metallic edginess and aggressive, fast-paced songs. Generally heavier rock than I’d listen to but I’ve fallen in love with Dani Neff’s vocals and feminist spirit.
Neff possesses a potent, versatile voice which reminds me of Garbage’s Shirley Manson. She’s phenomenally talented and expressive through her vocals and guitar shredding. Dani Neff was named Austin’s Best Electric Guitarist by the Austin Chronicle. She’s also a lawyer, feminist, dancer, musician, painter, reiki practitioner. What’s there not to like?

Dani’s voice expresses so many distinct emotions and provides lightness to the darker music that the band pieces together. Generous riffs and heavy drums carry you through “Hug from a Robot” in which Dani sings sweetly. “Time to Go” opens with catchy arrangements and lovely lyrics. There are so many layers to this album. “Haunted Factory” is a bit of an anthem. Thing get a bit twangy on “This Town,” a fun, quick, sultry song. Ending with “Chromatic Fantasy,” a rip-roaring beautiful mediation on goals, pulls everything together. You’ll get something different out of it after every listen–peeling yet another layer from the complex compositions. This is a superbly gifted band and its sophomore album Maximalist showcases those inherent talents.

Maximalist
Label: Danimal Kingdom
Release Date: April 15th, 2014

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MEGAFAUNA LIVE:

04/19 Austin, TX @ Mohawk Outside – Album release party/SXSWcares Fundraiser
04/23 New Orleans, LA @ Hi Ho
04/24 Atlanta, GA @ Mammal Gallery
04/25 Athens, GA @ Go Bar
04/26 Raleigh, NC @ Slim’s
04/27 Durham, NC @ Motorco
04/30 Philadelphia, PA @ North Star Bar
05/01 New York, NY @ Knitting Factory
05/02 Boston, MA @ Allston Rock City Hall
05/03 Providence, RI @ Columbus Theatre
05/07 Toronto, ON, Canada Music Week @ Hard Luck Bar
05/08 Toronto, ON, Canada Music Week @ Bovine Sex Club
05/11 Ferndale, MI @ The New Way
05/13 Chicago, IL @ The Burlington
05/14 Indianapolis, IN @ Melody Inn
05/15 St. Louis, MO @ The Demo
05/16 Hot Springs, AR @ Maxine’s Live
05/17 Denton, TX @ Dan’s Silverleaf
05/28 El Paso, TX @ Low Brow
05/29 Tuscon, AZ @ Sky Bar
05/30 Los Angeles, CA @ Casey’s Irish Pub
06/04 Costa Mesa, CA @ Casa
06/06 Los Angeles, CA @ Los Globos
06/08 Long Beach, CA @ Alex’s Bar
06/11 San Francisco, CA @ Brick and Mortar
06/14 Seattle, WA @ The Sunset
06/18 Salt Lake City, UT @ Kilby Court
06/19 Denver, CO @ Marquis Theatre
06/20 Boulder, CO @ Illegal Pete’s
06/21 Albuquerque, NM @ Sister Bar

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Choice Quote: Kiera Knightley on feminism

keira-knightley-talks-feminism-with-harpers-bazaar-uk

“I remember doing interviews, and people would ask, as if it was a joke, ‘So you mean you are a feminist?’ As though feminism couldn’t be discussed unless we were making fun of it. I don’t want to deny my femininity,” she said at the time.

“I think it’s great that the discussions are finally being allowed to be had [about feminism], as opposed to anybody mentioning feminism and everybody going, ‘Oh, f***ing shut up.’ Somehow, it became a dirty word. I thought it was really weird for a long time, and I think it’s great that we’re coming out of that.”

Harper’s Bazaar UK, February 2014 issue

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According to NPR, I’m a SLUT.

Should I be shocked by the following joke NPR’s Wait Wait hosts made about Sex and the City going off the air a decade ago?

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Carl Kasell: “. . . it was a time we embraced our inner sluts.”

Peter Sagal: “It’s been 10 years since Sex and the City inspired women everywhere to move to New York, sleep around and spend their money on shoes.”

It’s a cheap joke. It’s disgusting. And with women being raked over the coals by our government lately, it’s unbelievable that an NPR program would deign to think this the slightest bit humorous. Need I remind people that Republicans currently are turning back the clock for women and taking away birth control options and abortion rights from women? Watch this awesome speech by my Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren [D, MA]. Republicans across the country have tried to reverse abortion rights in Texas, Mississippi, Ohio, North Carolina and several other states. And in many states they’ve succeeded in reducing a women’s right to choose.

cute and sexy

Slut. A despicable word. Degrading. The word is demeaning. Men use that word to dis-empower women. This rhetoric must stop. There’s nothing amusing about it. When did someone decide that casual sex was a negative? I’m 44 and I’ve been hearing this for decades. I’ve had more than a handful of sex partners and that’s my business. I’ve lost count of the number of a man I’ve slept with and that’s my business. I’ve had threesomes along the way and that’s my business. No one needs to know how many men I’ve slept with. I know who I am and what kind of sexual experiences I want and it’s my body and it’s my decision to have sex however I want with whomever I want how often I want. I have an IUD. I use a condom. I’ve never wanted to get married nor have children. That’s also my business.

Some might call me a slut. I’ve been called a hooker for wearing red patent leather shoes. We know there’s that double standard and it’ll always be there and however loud feminists yell and yell and yell we’ll never be heard. We are not sluts. A man can have sex with 100 women and he’s cool. A woman has sex with 100 men and she’s a slut. Virgin/whore. Few people want to be with someone who has zero sexual experience. Don’t believe that fantasy.

I haven’t had sex in a year. What are you going to call me now?

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Feminist artists speaking OUT — Chvrches singer Lauren Mayberry and Natalie Portman

lauren from chvrches

Chvrches singer Lauren Mayberry wrote a column in the Guardian about online misogyny. She spoke about the ease in which people feel it’s okay to write messages calling her a slut, threatening to rape her and pick her appearance and intelligence apart due to her gender.

In the piece she states:

“I should note here that I have never said that men – in the public eye or otherwise – do not receive such comments. I can, however, only speak of what I know, which is that the number of offensive messages directed towards me, “the girl singer,” compared to my bandmates is undeniably higher. I should also clarify that this has nothing to do with hating men, as some have suggested. I identify as a feminist but subscribe to the pretty basic definition of a feminist as “someone who seeks equality between the sexes”. I am now, and have always been, in bands with smart, supportive guys, and have many amazing men in my life as family and friends. For that I am incredibly grateful.

“Of my numerous personal failings (perpetual lateness; a tendency towards anxiety; a complete inability to bake anything, ever), naivety is not one. I am often cynical about aspects of the music industry and the media, and was sure from the off that this band would need to avoid doing certain things in order for us to be taken seriously as musicians – myself in particular. We have thus far been lucky enough to do things our own way and make a pretty decent job of our band without conforming to the “push the girl to the front” blueprint often relied upon by labels and management in a tragic attempt to sell records which has little to do with the music itself.”

Natalie-Portman-Elle-UK-November-2013

super-feminist Natalie Portman spoke about feminism with Thor co-star Tom Hiddleston for the November issue of ELLE UK:

“I want every version of a woman and a man to be possible. I want women and men to be able to be full-time parents or full-time working people or any combination of the two. I want both to be able to do whatever they want sexually without being called names. I want them to be allowed to be weak and strong and happy and sad – human, basically. The fallacy in Hollywood is that if you’re making a “feminist” story, the woman kicks ass and wins. That’s not feminist, that’s macho. A movie about a weak, vulnerable woman can be feminist if it shows a real person that we can empathise with.”

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Women’s History Month: focus on Kate Chopin

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Kate O’Flaherty Chopin [1857-1904]

–born to prosperous St. Louis family
–married at twenty-one, lived with her husband in Reconstruction Louisiana on the family plantation in New Orleans for 12 years
–had six children
–her husband died in 1882 and she returned to St. Louis and began writing about her experience in the Bayou.
–she wrote short stories for magazines including Atlantic, Harper’s and Vogue and a novel called At Fault [1890]

awakening

–After the publication of her novel The Awakening [1899] with themes of depression, sexual awakening and suicide, she became ostracized and never wrote again.

“There were days when she was very happy without knowing why. She was happy to be alive and breathing, when her whole being seemed to be one with the sunlight, the color, the odors, the luxuriant warmth of some perfect Southern day. She liked then to wander alone into strange and unfamiliar places. She discovered many a sunny, sleepy corner, fashioned to dream in. And she found it good to dream and to be alone and unmolested.

There were days when she was unhappy, she did not know why—when it did not seem worth while to be glad or sorry, to be alive or dead; when life appeared to her like a grotesque pandemonium and humanity like worms struggling blindly toward inevitable annihilation.”

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KATE NASH: North American TOUR

Kate Nash

03/12 – Brighton Music Hall – Boston, MA
03/13 – Cabaret Mile End – Montreal, QC
03/15 – Horseshoe Tavern – Toronto, ON
03/16 – Magic Bag – Detroit, MI
03/17 – Pyramid Scheme – Grand Rapids, MI
03/18 – Empty Bottle – Chicago, IL
03/20 – Basement – Columbus, OH
03/21 – Mr. Smalls – Pittsburgh, PA
03/23 – Black Cat – Washington, DC
03/24 – Johnny Brenda’s – Philadelphia, PA
03/26 – Bowery Ballroom – New York, NY

Kate Nash will be touring with an all-female band and partnering with the Because I am a Girl charity.

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GIRL TALK album out 3/5

Available via pledge music

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